Seasonal

Summer care tips for your dog

Hot, Dog Days of SummerThis summer, DON’T FORGET:  Dogs don’t sweat like you do. Keep cool water for your pet and check their shade.

DON'T LEAVE PETS IN PARKED CARS. ON A 78 DEGREE DAY, A CAR PARKED IN THE SUN CAN REACH 160 DEGREES IN MINUTES.

Every summer dogs left in hot cars suffer brain damage and die.  Even opening windows or parking in the shade won’t prevent a dog from getting overheated. The heat is especially hard on dogs because they can’t perspire and can only cool themselves by painting and by sweating through the pads of their feet.  With only hot air to breath, dogs and other animals can suffer irreparable brain damage and die from heatstroke.

If you see an animal in a parked car during the summer, alert the management of the shopping mall or store.  If the owner does not return promptly, call local animal control or police immediately.  Look for signs of heat stress - heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid pulse, unsteadiness, staggering, vomiting, or a deep red or purple tongue.  If the pet becomes overheated, the body temperature must be lowered immediately by moving him to the shade and apply cool (not cold) water to his body to gradually lower his temperature, apply ice packs to the head, neck and chest only, let him drink small amounts of water, and take him to a veterinarian directly - it could save his life.

Don’t make a tragic mistake: Please don’t leave your pet in a parked car on a warm day.  It’s cruel and is punishable by law.  On warm days, your pet is safer at home!

PROTECT YOUR DOG BY TAKING THE FOLLOWING PRECAUTIONS:

  • Don’t take a chance-leave your dog at home on warm days. Even just a quick trip to the store can be deadly.
  • Don’t carry a dog unrestrained in a pick-up truck bed. A dog can be unintentionally thrown into traffic if the driver suddenly hits the brakes, swerves, or hit by another car.   Dogs should ride either in the cab or in a secured crate in the bed of the truck.  Besides being extremely dangerous the hot metal can burn dog’s feet.
  • Plant food, fertilizer, and insecticides can be fatal if your pet ingests them.
  • Make sure your pet is always wearing a collar and identification tag. If you are separated from your pet, an ID tag may be his only way home.
  • Check with your veterinarian about heartworm prevention. Heartworm disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, can be fatal in dogs and cats.
  • Pets and pools can equal disaster. Prevent free access to pools and always supervise a pet in a pool.
  • Another summertime threat is fleas and ticks. Some over the counter flea and tick products can be toxic, even when used according to instructions.
  • Don’t take your pets to crowded summer events such as concerts or fairs.  The loud noises and crowds, combined with the heat, can be stressful and dangerous for pets.  For your pet’s well being, leave him/her at home.  Be especially aware of these threats during holidays, such as the Fourth of July.